Remember

Monday, May 29, 2017

Memorial Day

"Memorial Day is a federal holiday in the United States for remembering the people who died while serving in the country's armed forces."



Source

Friday, May 26, 2017

Friday Films:Historic films about drones and pilotless aircraft

Not sure about the order because it seems to not be in any logical sequence. On the other hand, if you want to watch films about the early days of drones and such, here you go, courtesy of Periscope Films with 13 movies:



To get the full story on each film especially the silent ones, I recommend you view them on YouTube, which you can do by clicking on the YouTube button in the lower right  when the film starts.

Enjoy!

Thursday, May 25, 2017

Sailors at Sea? New Navy Fitness Suit Not for Thee?

Ta-Dah! A new Navy Navy Fitness Suit which seems just dandy for everyone except, I dunno, sailors on ships:
Navy photo of the NFS
WASHINGTON (NNS) -- Navy announced Wednesday the manner of wear and availability for the new Navy Fitness Suit and women's choker style Service Dress White (SDW) jacket for chief petty officers and officers in NAVADMIN 125/17.

The new fitness suit completes the Navy's Physical Training Uniform (PTU) ensemble and will be a sea bag requirement for Sailors beginning Sept. 30, 2021. It is Navy blue, fully lined and made of water repellent, moisture wicking and odor-resistant fabric, with gold color NAVY logos and trimmed with silver reflective piping.

Beginning in July, the fitness suit will be available at select fleet concentration areas with Fleet-wide availability through Uniform Centers and the Navy Exchange Uniform Call Center no later than October 2017. Recruit Training Command is now issuing the fitness suit to new recruits.

The suit is designed primarily for group and unit physical training activities and the semi-annual physical readiness test.

The jacket should be worn over the PTU shirt, zipped at least three quarters up and sleeve cuffs should extend beyond the wrist, but not beyond the lower knuckle of the thumb. The pants will be worn on the waist over the PTU shorts, should extend down between the shoe top and heel but not beyond the heel.

The fitness suit is not authorized to be worn while in a duty status or when conducting official business on base.

Optional items that can be worn with the suit include the Blue Navy or Command Ball Cap, Navy Watch Cap, and thermal undergarments.

***

To help maintain the fitness suit for the expected four years before requiring replacement, it should be washed and dried at a low temperature setting in home-style machines. Using the industrial shipboard or bulk laundry is not recommended.
Emphasis added.

It's like being a sailor on a ship is . . . not something the uniform people worry about, isn't it?

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

If You Grow the Fleet, Who Is "Optimizing the US Navy's combat logistics force?"

Prompted by the celebration One Hundred Years of U.S. Navy Replenishment at Sea, it's good to remind ourselves that if you want to have world-wide fleet operations, you need to be able to sustain your fleet wherever it is and for as long
 as necessary.

A good history of refueling at sea can be found in Thomas Wildenberg's Gray Steel and Black Oil: Fast Tankers and Replenishment at Sea in the U.S. Navy, 1912-1995 which features this quote:
USNS Supply
Fuel stands first in importance of the resources of the fleet. Without ammunition, a ship may run away, hoping to fight another day but without fuel she can neither run, nor reach her station, nor remain on it, if remote, nor fight.
ALFRED THAYER MAHAN

A partial history of naval logistics in WWII can be found at Beans, Bullets, and Black Oil: The Story of Fleet Logistics Afloat in the Pacific During World War II by Rear Adm. Worrall Reed Carter.

And more of the WWII story in Ships, Salvage, and Sinews of War: The Story of Fleet Logistics Afloat in Atlantic and Mediterranean Waters During World War II by Rear Admirals Worrall Reed Carter andElmer Ellsworth Duvall USN (Retired).

For the War in Korea, there is Logistics & Support Activities, 1950-1953 --Overview and Selected Views:
Logistics and support activities were vital to the success of U.S. and United Nations Korean War operations. Without extensive and efficient trans-oceanic shipping, the tens of thousands of service people and the hundreds of thousands of tons of "beans, bullets and black oil" needed every month to prosecute the war would never have reached a war zone that was some five thousand miles from the U.S. west coast and about twice that far from eastern seaboard ports. Without underway replenishment of warships off the Korean coast, the effectiveness of Naval forces there would have been substantially reduced. Without well-equipped and effectively-staffed Japanese bases close to the combat theater, sea and air operations against the Communist aggressors would have been gravely hindered, and, during the crisis periods of summer 1950 and winter 1950-51, probably impossible. Without ports and other facilities in South Korea, the insertion and sustenance of the large ground forces needed to defend that country simply could not have been done, and local naval operations would have been hamstrung.

Like much else about the Korean War, its logistics and support effort depended extensively on the legacy of World War II. Transport ships, long-range aircraft and much of the other equipment used in supporting the war had been made during that great conflict and had been wisely retained against the possibility that it might be needed again. The senior officer and enlisted servicemen and civilian sailors and airmen who resurrected the logistics and support system in response to the Korean crisis, and kept it running thereafter, had largely learned their crafts in the struggle against Japan and Germany.
For the Vietnam War, there's Mobility, support, endurance : a story of naval operational logistics in the Vietnam War, 1965-1968 by Vice Admiral Edwin B. Hooper (Retired):
Over the years a number of general officers and a few flag officers in
USNS Bighorn
positions of responsibility have written their own accounts of what went on during a major war. Quite understandably these have tended to focus mainly on the purely combat features of the war and on overall strategy. The result has often been an unbalanced picture of the total military effort.

To complete the picture, it is necessary to place in proper perspective the logistic support actions upon which the combatant forces and the effectiveness of these forces were totally dependent. It is the coupling of combat strength and logistic support that makes victory possible, whether it be action by a small unit, a major battle, a campaign, a war, or the wide variety of peacetime operations to support the national interest. Thus, along with knowledge of combat activities, one must gain an appreciation of logistics, of its relationship to operations, and the nature of operational logistic actions for a full understanding of a war. Hopefully, this recording of the activities of the Service Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet, will advance that appreciation, and contribute to a more complete picture of the Vietnam Conflict.
What about going forward? Here's a OR look at the issues as they existed in 2008.


If you are wondering about the current Navy combat logistics force, it is now in the Military Sealift Command and the inventory of ships can be found here.

Is sea-going logistics a concern? See this 2014 article by James Holmes, US Surrenders Naval Logistics Supremacy: Without underway replenishment ships, America’s ability to project power in wartime will shrivel.:
If the United States wants to escape the danger zone in its strategic competition with China — disproving Beijing’s fancy that it can rule the Western Pacific — decommissioning the U.S. Navy’s fastest, most capacious combat logistics ships is no way to do it. Just the opposite. It telegraphs that America is no longer serious about fighting far from North America for long spans of time. Competitors will take note.

Monday, May 22, 2017

U.S. Navy Office of Naval Intelligence Worldwide Threat to Shipping (WTS) Report 17 April - 17 May 2017 and HORN OF AFRICA/GULF OF GUINEA/ SOUTHEAST ASIA: Piracy Analysis and Warning Weekly (PAWW) Report for 11 - 17 May 2017



One Hundred Years of U.S. Navy Replenishment at Sea

Navy Admin Message
UNCLASSIFIED

ROUTINE R
161747Z MAY 17
FM CNO WASHINGTON DC TO NAVADMIN
INFO CNO WASHINGTON DC
BT
UNCLAS
NAVADMIN 121/17
MSGID/GENADMIN/CNO WASHINGTON DC/N4/MAY/

SUBJ/MARKING 100 YEARS OF UNDERWAY REPLENISHMENTS//
RMKS/
1. MAY 2017 MARKS THE CENTENNIAL ANNIVERSARY OF OUR NAVYS MODERN UNDERWAY REPLENISHMENT (UNREP) CAPABILITIES. THIS UNIQUELY AMERICAN OPERATIONAL CAPABILITY ENABLES THE NAVYS COMBAT LOGISTICS FORCE (CLF) TO PROVIDE A CRITICAL LIFELINE TO OUR OPERATING FORCES AT SEA. THROUGH UNDERWAY REPLENISHMENT, THE CLF PROVIDES FUEL, AMMUNITION, FOOD, SPARE PARTS AND OTHER SUPPLIES NECESSARY TO ENABLE OUR CARRIER STRIKE GROUPS (CSGS) AND AMPHIBIOUS READY GROUPS (ARGS) TO OPERATE WORLDWIDE, WITH LITTLE TO NO RELIANCE ON HOST NATION SUPPORT.

2. THE FIRST OPEN-OCEAN REPLENISHMENT OF A US NAVY WARSHIP WAS CONDUCTED BY CAPTAIN SILAS TALBOT IN DECEMBER 1799 ONBOARD THE USS CONSTITUTION. BY USING SMALL BOATS TO REPLENISH, CONSTITUTION WAS ABLE TO STAY AT SEA FOR OVER 347 DAYS, PROTECTING AMERICAN SHIPPING IN THE CARIBBEAN WHILE AVOIDING ENTANGLEMENTS IN FOREIGN HARBORS. ON 28 MAY 1917, THEN LIEUTENANT CHESTER NIMITZ, EXECUTIVE OFFICER OF USS MAUMEE (AO 2), PIONEERED OUR MODERN METHOD OF UNREP, BY REFUELING SIX DESTROYERS EN ROUTE TO ENGLAND FOR OPERATIONS IN WWI. DURING WWII, FURTHER IMPROVEMENTS IN UNDERWAY REPLENISHMENT, INCLUDING THE FIRST TRANSFER OF ORDNANCE, ENABLED THE NAVYS CARRIER TASK FORCES TO OPERATE INDEPENDENT OF FORWARD OPERATING BASES FOR MONTHS ON END. FOLLOWING WWII, THE NAVY CONTINUED TO IMPROVE THE RELIABILITY AND EFFECTIVENESS OF ITS UNREP SYSTEM. THERE ARE CURRENTLY OVER 390 FUEL AND CARGO DELIVERY STATIONS IN THE NAVY AND AN UNTOLD NUMBER AMONG OUR ALLIES, ALLOWING SHIPS FROM DOZENS OF NATIONS TO OPERATE TOGETHER FOR PROLONGED PERIODS AT SEA.

3. TODAY, THE CIVILIAN MARINERS OF THE MILITARY SEALIFT COMMAND OPERATE AND MAINTAIN THE NAVYS 29 COMBAT LOGISTICS FORCE REPLENISHMENT SHIPS. THE SKILL AND PROFESSIONALISM OF OUR SAILORS AND CIVILIAN MARINERS IN THE EXECUTION OF SAFE AND EFFICIENT UNREPS EACH YEAR ENABLE THE NAVY TO REMAIN ON STATION AROUND THE WORLD, PROTECTING AMERICA FROM ATTACK AND WHEN REQUIRED, ENABLING DECISIVE COMBAT OPERATIONS. BRAVO ZULU!//

Saturday, May 20, 2017

Saturday Is Old Radio Day: Lux Radio Theatre "No Highway in the Sky" (1952)

Jimmy Stewart, Marlene Dietrich recreate their movie roles in No Highway in the
Sky:



About:
The film is based on the novel No Highway by Nevil Shute and was one of the first films that depicted a potential aviation disaster involving metal fatigue.