MH60S

Wednesday, February 24, 2010

Haiti: Port Repair, Port Operations and Fuel Operations

It's been a week or so since we last looked in on how the recovery operation for Haiti's vital ports has been going (click on one of "labels" down below to see earlier reports). Since then the U.S. Navy and other cooperating forces have made substantial progress in opening up the vital sea life line to the Haitian people:

(1) Fuel Operations Resume at Haiti's Main Terminal Varreux:
WIN Group, the Haitian enterprise that owns and operates Terminal Varreux in Port-au-Prince, and SEACOR Holdings Inc. ... announced that emergency repairs have enabled crucial tanker shipments of fuel to resume to Haiti.

Restoration of Terminal Varreux's marine operations included the installation of an interim vessel mooring system, the repair and testing of critical piping systems and the revision of terminal operating procedures. Additional emergency construction at Terminal Varreux is also providing the capability to receive containerized cargoes, furthering recovery efforts.

The first tanker began discharging its initial load of fuel at the restored berth on Friday, February 5. The shipment was completed in the early morning hours on Sunday, February 7 and the vessel has departed from the terminal.

"We are all taking a deep breath now that the fuel supply to Haiti has been restored," said Youri Mevs, managing partner of WIN Group. "Without fuel the recovery effort is clearly paralyzed. We commend SEACOR for mobilizing so quickly to address this dire situation, as well as WIN Group's staff in Port-Au-Prince. They all worked around the clock through very challenging circumstances. As a result, Terminal Varreux will continue its role as a key element of Haiti's long-term recovery efforts."

Terminal Varreux is located five miles from the epicenter of the devastating January 12 earthquake, and suffered damage to its piers and facilities, but the bulk of the port's 18 storage tanks were undamaged. Terminal Varreux's tanks have a total capacity of approximately 45 million gallons.
(2) Port salvage and repair ops:
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (Feb. 21, 2010) An aerial view of the logistical area near the port in Port-au-Prince. Several U.S. and international military and non-governmental agencies are conducting humanitarian and disaster relief operations as part of Operation Unified Response after a 7.0-magnitude earthquake caused severe damage in and around Port-au-Prince, Haiti Jan. 12. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Meranda Keller/Released)
(3) Joint Logistics Over the Shore (JLOTS) is moving cargo:
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (Feb. 20, 2010) Service members conducting joint logistics over the shore operations at the main seaport in Port-au-Prince, Haiti off-load construction vehicles and equipment assigned to the U.S. Army 7th Sustainment Brigade from the British-flagged Crowley Shipper. Several U.S. and international military and non-governmental agencies are conducting humanitarian and disaster relief operations as part of Operation Unified Response after a 7.0-magnitude earthquake caused severe damage in and around Port-au-Prince, Haiti Jan. 12. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kim Williams/Released)
(4) American sailors, solidiers and Marines are moving food and water to the people of Haiti - by trucks and by strong backs:
PORT-AU-PRINCE Haiti (Feb. 22, 2010) Operations Specialist 2nd Class Roberto Piedra, assigned to Amphibious Construction Battalion (ACB) 2, and Haitian citizens offload rice at Varreoux Beach in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. ACB-2 is conducting construction, humanitarian and disaster relief operations as part of Operation Unified Response after a 7.0 magnitude earthquake caused severe damage in and around Port-au-Prince, Haiti Jan. 12. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Meranda L. Keller/Released)
(5) From Gitmo, other sailors are helping the Haitians:
GUANTANAMO BAY, Cuba (Feb. 18, 2010) Logistics Specialist 2nd Class Jose Gomez, assigned to Navy Reserve Naval Cargo Handling Battalion 13, loads lumber to a crane to be transported to Haiti. More than 180,000 board feet of lumber was sent to support Operation Unified Response. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Michael B. Watkins/Released)
All this work is helping the Haitians. See here:
- WFP and partners have reached over 3.7 million people with food assistance since the start of the response; some 102 community out-patient care centres for the treatment of severely acute malnutrition, along with 18 mobile units, are operating throughout the country.

- WASH partners are currently reaching 850,000 people with 5 litres of water a day, covering 83 per cent of the target population. . .
UPDATE: UK sends RFA Largs Bay:
The British amphibious landing ship Royal Fleet Auxiliary Largs Bay arrived off Haiti loaded with essential stores and equipment in aid of the earthquake victims yesterday, Thursday 18 February 2010.
RFA Largs Bay

The ship's mission is on behalf of the Department for International Development, Save the Children and the International Federation of Red Cross.

The 16,160-tonne ship sailed from the Sea Mounting Centre at Marchwood, near Southampton, on 3 February tasked with delivering bulky items that are not suitable for air freight.

Her cargo includes 5,700 sheets of corrugated iron to build much-needed shelters, 40 vehicles and 15 containers of general stores.

Hat tip to Lee and Charles.

1 comment:

  1. Eagle1, You were on top of the best way the military could provide disaster relief during the crisis in Haiti. I want to show you a new technology we've been working on for 5 years that is a significantly faster and cheaper option for sea-based disaster relief and amphibious military operations. Please e-mail me at jeremy(at)tetheredair(dot)com, and I will show you a 6-minute video.. I think you'll be fascinated. We are just about ready to talk publicly, but I want to talk to the military first. Please give us an ear, and help us see your perspective on this. Thanks, Jeremy sends

    ReplyDelete